User performance by the difference between motor and visual widths for small target pointing

Hiroki Usuba, Shota Yamanaka, Homei Miyashita

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigate user performance by the difference between motor and visual widths when pointing to small targets. In recent desktop GUIs, the visual shapes of targets tend to be smaller than the motor width. For example, the motor width of a window frame in which the user can click tends to be larger than the visual width. We assume that it is difficult to point to the target when the motor and visual widths are different. Therefore, we compare the conditions where the motor and visual widths are equal and not equal. The results show that, compared with the conditions where the motor and visual widths were equal, users completed a task without any problems in terms of movement time and error rate even if the visual width was one pixel when the motor and visual widths were not equal. We also discuss the potential implications such as design for visually small targets.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNordiCHI 2018
Subtitle of host publicationRevisiting the Life Cycle - Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages161-169
Number of pages9
ISBN (Electronic)9781450364379
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Sep 2018
Event10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, NordiCHI 2018 - Oslo, Norway
Duration: 29 Sep 20183 Oct 2018

Publication series

NameACM International Conference Proceeding Series

Conference

Conference10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, NordiCHI 2018
CountryNorway
CityOslo
Period29/09/183/10/18

Keywords

  • Difference in motor and visual widths
  • Fitts' law
  • Human performance
  • Small target pointing

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  • Cite this

    Usuba, H., Yamanaka, S., & Miyashita, H. (2018). User performance by the difference between motor and visual widths for small target pointing. In NordiCHI 2018: Revisiting the Life Cycle - Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (pp. 161-169). (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series). Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/3240167.3240171