Dose-dependent hypocholesterolemic actions of dietary apple polyphenol in rats fed cholesterol

Kyoichi Osada, Takashi Suzuki, Yuki Kawakami, Mineo Senda, Atsushi Kasai, Manabu Sami, Yutaka Ohta, Tomomasa Kanda, Mitsuo Ikeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dose-dependent hypocholesterolemic and antiatherogenic effects of dietary apple polyphenol (AP) from unripe apple, which contains approximately 85% catechin oligomers (procyanidins), were examined in male Sprague-Dawley rats (4 wk of age) given a purified diet containing 0.5% cholesterol. Dietary AP at 0.5 and 1.0% levels significantly decreased the liver cholesterol level compared with that in the control (AP-free diet-fed) group. Dietary AP also significantly lowered the serum cholesterol level compared with that in the control group. However, the HDL cholesterol level was significantly higher in the 1.0% AP-fed group than in the control group. Accordingly, the ratio of HDL-cholesterol/total cholesterol was significantly higher in the 0.5% AP-fed group and 1.0% AP-fed group than in the control group. Moreover, the atherogenic indices in the 0.5 and 1.0% AP-fed groups were significantly lower than those in the control group. The activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase tended to be increased by dietary AP in a dose-dependent manner. In accord with this observation, dietary AP increased the excretion of acidic steroids in feces. Dietary AP also significantly promoted the fecal excretion of neutral steroids in a dose-dependent manner. These observations suggest that dietary AP at a 0.5 or 1.0% level exerts hypocholesterolemic and antiatherogenic effects through the promotion of cholesterol catabolism and inhibition of intestinal absorption of cholesterol.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-139
Number of pages7
JournalLipids
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2006

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